Community Download: How Important Do You Think Resolution Is For VR Headsets?

September 17, 2018

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Let’s get this out of the way first: resolution is incredibly important for VR headsets. Like, really important. The screen door effect is extremely distracting and if visuals aren’t crisp in a VR experience then it can immediately take you out of the immersion.With the Vive Pro on the market, the Samsung Odyssey gaining momentum, and now the Pimax 8K and Pimax 5K+ in the hands of YouTube influencers, as well as the new StarVR and VRgineers headsets all in development, the era of limited and cramped resolutions may be coming to an end very quickly.There are lots of points to consider though. God rays can be distracting too, as well as limited FOVs. And there’s the ongoing debate between framerate vs. resolution and which is more important. Throw in other factors like comfort, ancillary features such as eye tracking, and it’s a complex topic — especially now that more and more people will start cutting the cord and going wireless. What’s the most important thing in a VR headset?

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Animax is an Emmy-winning multi-platform production company and agency. From strategy to creative and technical production to marketing and media planning, Animax offers clients full service capabilities and develops original content for broadcast and broadband. This includes animation, games, apps, video and branded entertainment.

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