Community Download: How Important Do You Think Resolution Is For VR Headsets?

Let’s get this out of the way first: resolution is incredibly important for VR headsets. Like, really important. The screen door effect is extremely distracting and if visuals aren’t crisp in a VR experience then it can immediately take you out of the immersion.With the Vive Pro on the market, the Samsung Odyssey gaining momentum, and now the Pimax 8K and Pimax 5K+ in the hands of YouTube influencers, as well as the new StarVR and VRgineers headsets all in development, the era of limited and cramped resolutions may be coming to an end very quickly.There are lots of points to consider though. God rays can be distracting too, as well as limited FOVs. And there’s the ongoing debate between framerate vs. resolution and which is more important. Throw in other factors like comfort, ancillary features such as eye tracking, and it’s a complex topic — especially now that more and more people will start cutting the cord and going wireless. What’s the most important thing in a VR headset?

Spotlight

Al Roker Entertainment, Inc

Al Roker Entertainment, Inc (ARE) is a leading producer of original, award-winning TV programs & digital content for the world's best networks & brands. Led by 13-time Emmy award winning TV personality & trusted multi-media authority Al Roker, ARE produces all forms of content for distribution across a variety of platforms around the world, including: broadcast, cable, digital, OTT, social & SVOD.Some of our programs include the reality-based “DEA” for Spike TV, “Kimberly’s Simply Southern” for Great American Country, "Celebrity Holiday Homes"​ for HGTV, and the Weather Channel hit “Coast Guard Alaska” and "Coast Guard Florida"​ (now airing on PLUTO TV). Recently, the company also produced "Girl Starter"​ - a branded entertainment venture - airing on TLC & Discovery Family, promoting female entrepreneurship and presented by Staples, Microsoft, Visa, US Air Force, Vera Bradley, and Klarbrunn. More here: https://www.girlstarter.com/

OTHER ARTICLES
Media and Broadcasting, Business

New Doom VR Mod Releasing Soon For Oculus Quest

Article | August 4, 2022

The release will feature 5 sets of VR weapons and a launcher that will allow you to mix and match different Doom mods with ease. There’s support for smooth locomotion and teleport movement options, plus you’ll be able to switch between a couple of different walking speeds for the former. The person behind the mod is DrBeef, who has previously completed a number of well-known Quest ports and VR projects. He was behind the Lambda1VR mod for Oculus Quest, as well as QuakeQuest and many others.

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Virtualization, Media and Broadcasting

Ongoing transitions in gaming industry

Article | July 13, 2022

The gaming industry is continuously evolving with current transitions derived from VR/AR, blockchain, 5G and cloud computing. The aim of this transition is to fulfill requirements of gamers such as reducing the cost of gaming, developing more immersive experience, converting tools bought in games as transferable assets, enabling gamers to play graphic intensive games on low cost devices. Currently popular games are on the go to create augmented reality versions to be played on AR headsets with their mobile phones. The google stadia platform(a platform where graphic intensive games run in data centers and gamers can play them via web browsers) has also enabled the gaming industry to eliminate the computing limitations imposed by running games in mobile devices. The only barrier in coupling both technologies to have the best of both worlds is low bandwidth of 4G which will soon be expanded when 5G rolls out in the market. TRANSITIONS IN GAMING INDUSTRY The real time game play is currently not possible for games running in data centers and being rendered on web browsers of a gamer’s device as there is latency in reflecting the character’s action on the press of a button. Such a transition will eliminate the need for highly expensive gaming consoles which has been curbing the growth rate of the gaming industry. One more concern from gamers that’s being a barrier in revenue generation for the gaming industry is that the weapons, power packs, kits and tool kits bought in any game are simply virtual and become useless when they are done with the game. The idea to buy such time bound utility becomes insensible for players. So, now the gaming industry is evaluating the option to register these buyouts in games on blockchain which can later be used as a non tangible asset by players to trade easily. The gaming theory that’s getting popularised these days will eventually leverage the AR and VR technology to transform the education industry. The idea to provide customers with user manuals running in augmented reality that can enable a non trained worker to operate the machine is also booming. Solidworks by 3Dplm is one such tool that’s heading in this direction. The transitions mentioned above are quite exciting and the way gaming industry and mentioned technologies are evolving we can expect to get our hands on such exciting gaming technology soon too at a fraction of current costs.

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Solutions, Business

The new chair of the FTC and antitrust 2.0

Article | July 7, 2022

The appointment of Lina Khan on June 15th to chair of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is poised to be a transformational one in the history of the world wide web. Khan came to prominence with an article in the Yale Law Journal, Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox, which identified the paradox of hegemonic tech service providers which bypass the US’ strict competition laws by offering lower prices to the end consumer. Under US antitrust law, the driving indicator of market monopolies are higher prices for the consumer – under this strict definition, none of the tech majors which dominate the digital economy are monopolistic. Indeed, some such as Alphabet and Facebook do not even directly charge the end user for their services. So, while both Google and Facebook dominate the global digital ad market, making an antitrust case against them under the current 20thcentury era regulatory framework is nigh on impossible. However, the absence of meaningful competitive challengers to these two incumbents in search and social advertising over the previous 15 years, despite the lucrative high margin business opportunities, implies that the competitive market is not performing according to classical economic theory. Khan has built a subsequent career on trying to square this circle, and now the Biden Administration has empowered her as the key instigator of the sweeping regulatory update required for a digital-first century.

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Technologies, Virtualization

3 Applications of AI in the Entertainment Industry

Article | August 2, 2022

The advent of artificial intelligence (AI) in the entertainment industry has automated time-consuming mundane tasks and increased proficiency in delivering winning content to drive engagement. Production businesses can make informed decisions on marketing and advertising because AI can examine critical data and provide important insights into consumer behavior. Let us look at three other important applications of AI in the entertainment industry: Content Personalization Made Easy Streaming websites like Spotify and Netflix contribute content that attracts a diverse audience with different tastes and choices. They are adopting AI and machine learning algorithms to analyze individual user performance and demographics to promote content that users are interested in. Such personalized content recommendations create audience engagement. AI also helps optimize video quality based on how fast the internet is in a certain place so that streaming works without buffering. Streamlined Movie Production Processes The movie production process is time-consuming and complex. Using AI can help automate processes like sound production, storyboarding, scheduling, and pre-production tasks. It can also automatically sync and group filmed clips. Machine learning has graphics and visual effects that can be used to make fictional characters look better. Subtitle Generation for International Communications Content publishing businesses need to cater to an audience from various regions. Multilingual subtitles make this interaction easier. Manual transcription is time-consuming and requires expensive human resources that businesses cannot afford. Also, human error and variable efficiency are issues that can tamper with customer experience. Any kind of delay in presenting subtitles can put the audio-video-subtitles out of sync. AI prevents such mishaps through speech and vocabulary integration in conversations using neural interfaces. Last Words Apart from the implementation of AI in entertainment, the development of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) apps will make the customer experience immersive and captivating. Moreover, AI-based chatbots can be used for promotional operations for books, films, artists, and TV shows. Platforms in the entertainment sector involve AI to efficiently enhance user engagement and production rates.

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Spotlight

Al Roker Entertainment, Inc

Al Roker Entertainment, Inc (ARE) is a leading producer of original, award-winning TV programs & digital content for the world's best networks & brands. Led by 13-time Emmy award winning TV personality & trusted multi-media authority Al Roker, ARE produces all forms of content for distribution across a variety of platforms around the world, including: broadcast, cable, digital, OTT, social & SVOD.Some of our programs include the reality-based “DEA” for Spike TV, “Kimberly’s Simply Southern” for Great American Country, "Celebrity Holiday Homes"​ for HGTV, and the Weather Channel hit “Coast Guard Alaska” and "Coast Guard Florida"​ (now airing on PLUTO TV). Recently, the company also produced "Girl Starter"​ - a branded entertainment venture - airing on TLC & Discovery Family, promoting female entrepreneurship and presented by Staples, Microsoft, Visa, US Air Force, Vera Bradley, and Klarbrunn. More here: https://www.girlstarter.com/

Related News

NVIDIA's Step in Data Centre Business Is a Success; Became as Big as Gaming

NVIDIA | May 25, 2020

NVIDIA Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue, NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers. NVIDIA has been stepping up its data center game for a while now. Last quarter's results indicate the effort has been worth it. Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year-over-year jump -- so big, in fact, that NVIDIA could justify pouring more time and resources into the market, now that it's proved it can do well in it. Data centers are the growth engine. For the three-month stretch ending on April 26, NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue into an adjusted per-share profit of $1.80. The top line was up 39% year over year, and adjusted earnings more than doubled from $0.88 per share in the prior-year quarter. Both numbers topped analysts' expectations, just as the company's revenue guidance for the current quarter did. That wasn't the most interesting aspect of NVIDIA's quarterly report, however. Far more intriguing was the $1.14 billion in data center technology sales. A year earlier, that figure was a much more modest $634 million. The quarterly tally trails gaming-related sales, which hit $1.34 billion for the first fiscal quarter, but ts data center business is growing much faster than any other segment. At its current pace, data center will overtake gaming as the company's biggest breadwinner. As history indicates, this is a fairly new development. Learn more: MICROGAMING COLLABORATES WITH INSPIRED ENTERTAINMENT TO ENHANCE GAMING EXPERIENCE . “NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business.” ~ Quant say News coverage of the numbers broadly suggested coronavirus-related lockdowns meant that companies were forced to improve their remote-work capabilities on the fly, generating demand for data center technology. And to be fair, the contagion likely did spur some fresh, unexpected demand. That's not how data centers usually work, though. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. The launch of the DGX A100 5-petaflop artificial intelligence (AI) system didn't happen until after the quarter began, but it was based on a design that was likely finalized before the COVID-19 outbreak. “NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers , though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. ” Ditto for Jarvis, an app platform that lets organizations tweak the use of AI in a variety of self-customized ways. It was launched last quarter, but prospective users are still kicking the tires. It can take months to just select and plan a data center's architecture. Enterprise customers didn't simply set up and pay for a data center in a matter of weeks. Ergo, if NVIDIA sold it last quarter, it was a sale that was apt to be set up well before the quarter began. To that end, one can readily see on the graphic above that data center sales had been ramping up for a couple of quarters even before the recently completed quarter got going. NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business Quant say it remains the clear leader in the graphics processing unit (GPU) market, which is NVIDIA's biggest business. It's a market worth fighting for. It's also worth noting that despite NVIDIA's data center growth last quarter, it still has only a small fraction of the data center computing market. Intel remains the powerhouse in the arena, leaning on its popular and more conventional data center technology -- based on central processing units (CPUs) -- to generate more than $23 billion in data center hardware revenue last year. NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers of tomorrow. Given the sales trajectory, though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. It's proved itself to be a player. It would be time (and effort) well spent. Market researcher Mordor Intelligence reports the size of the global GPU market was just under $21 billion as of last year, but the realization of GPUs as a powerful alternative to CPUs (particularly in AI) leads Mordor to conclude the GPU market will be worth more than $100 billion by 2024. Learn more: 20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY .

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Quake 2 is the best argument for Nvidia’s ray tracing

Venturebeat | January 22, 2019

If you want to see the potential of ray tracing, you should look to Quake 2. A new mod called Q2VKPT (Quake 2 with Vulkan path-tracing) is out now that adds real-time ray tracing to the classic shooter. And while Nvidia has turned to cutting-edge releases to hype people up for RTX, maybe it should use Quake 2 instead.In the 3-minute video above, you can see how effective RTX is at bringing a scene to life. White wall lamps reflect off of the floors. Explosions bathe the environment in momentary bursts of orange. And water reflects the entire room around it.All of this next-gen lighting tech is happening in a game that is from 1997. But RTX gives the world a sense of place and reality that looks almost modern. Sure, the enemy models are blocky and under animated, but they look like they are moving through physical space.

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Origin's Chronos PC is no looker, but it plays games with eye-popping detail

digitaltrends | January 21, 2019

We love giant tower computers. They’re big, bold, absurd, and we frankly prefer our computers to look more like an alien monolith than a useful piece of modern technology. Yet our way of thinking is certainly on the out. Computers continue to shrink in size as they grow in power.Which brings us to the Origin Chronos. The smallest desktop PC in the company’s line-up, the Chronos measures a bit less than a foot tall, four inches wide, and about 14 inches deep. That’s smaller than most A/V receivers, or about the size of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. It offers full-fat performance despite that. Our review unit came packing a Core i9-9900K and Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti, surely more than enough to please.Maybe the question is no longer “why should I buy a small desktop?” Maybe it’s now “why should I buy anything but?”

Read More

NVIDIA's Step in Data Centre Business Is a Success; Became as Big as Gaming

NVIDIA | May 25, 2020

NVIDIA Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue, NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers. NVIDIA has been stepping up its data center game for a while now. Last quarter's results indicate the effort has been worth it. Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year-over-year jump -- so big, in fact, that NVIDIA could justify pouring more time and resources into the market, now that it's proved it can do well in it. Data centers are the growth engine. For the three-month stretch ending on April 26, NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue into an adjusted per-share profit of $1.80. The top line was up 39% year over year, and adjusted earnings more than doubled from $0.88 per share in the prior-year quarter. Both numbers topped analysts' expectations, just as the company's revenue guidance for the current quarter did. That wasn't the most interesting aspect of NVIDIA's quarterly report, however. Far more intriguing was the $1.14 billion in data center technology sales. A year earlier, that figure was a much more modest $634 million. The quarterly tally trails gaming-related sales, which hit $1.34 billion for the first fiscal quarter, but ts data center business is growing much faster than any other segment. At its current pace, data center will overtake gaming as the company's biggest breadwinner. As history indicates, this is a fairly new development. Learn more: MICROGAMING COLLABORATES WITH INSPIRED ENTERTAINMENT TO ENHANCE GAMING EXPERIENCE . “NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business.” ~ Quant say News coverage of the numbers broadly suggested coronavirus-related lockdowns meant that companies were forced to improve their remote-work capabilities on the fly, generating demand for data center technology. And to be fair, the contagion likely did spur some fresh, unexpected demand. That's not how data centers usually work, though. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. The launch of the DGX A100 5-petaflop artificial intelligence (AI) system didn't happen until after the quarter began, but it was based on a design that was likely finalized before the COVID-19 outbreak. “NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers , though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. ” Ditto for Jarvis, an app platform that lets organizations tweak the use of AI in a variety of self-customized ways. It was launched last quarter, but prospective users are still kicking the tires. It can take months to just select and plan a data center's architecture. Enterprise customers didn't simply set up and pay for a data center in a matter of weeks. Ergo, if NVIDIA sold it last quarter, it was a sale that was apt to be set up well before the quarter began. To that end, one can readily see on the graphic above that data center sales had been ramping up for a couple of quarters even before the recently completed quarter got going. NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business Quant say it remains the clear leader in the graphics processing unit (GPU) market, which is NVIDIA's biggest business. It's a market worth fighting for. It's also worth noting that despite NVIDIA's data center growth last quarter, it still has only a small fraction of the data center computing market. Intel remains the powerhouse in the arena, leaning on its popular and more conventional data center technology -- based on central processing units (CPUs) -- to generate more than $23 billion in data center hardware revenue last year. NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers of tomorrow. Given the sales trajectory, though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. It's proved itself to be a player. It would be time (and effort) well spent. Market researcher Mordor Intelligence reports the size of the global GPU market was just under $21 billion as of last year, but the realization of GPUs as a powerful alternative to CPUs (particularly in AI) leads Mordor to conclude the GPU market will be worth more than $100 billion by 2024. Learn more: 20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY .

Read More

Quake 2 is the best argument for Nvidia’s ray tracing

Venturebeat | January 22, 2019

If you want to see the potential of ray tracing, you should look to Quake 2. A new mod called Q2VKPT (Quake 2 with Vulkan path-tracing) is out now that adds real-time ray tracing to the classic shooter. And while Nvidia has turned to cutting-edge releases to hype people up for RTX, maybe it should use Quake 2 instead.In the 3-minute video above, you can see how effective RTX is at bringing a scene to life. White wall lamps reflect off of the floors. Explosions bathe the environment in momentary bursts of orange. And water reflects the entire room around it.All of this next-gen lighting tech is happening in a game that is from 1997. But RTX gives the world a sense of place and reality that looks almost modern. Sure, the enemy models are blocky and under animated, but they look like they are moving through physical space.

Read More

Origin's Chronos PC is no looker, but it plays games with eye-popping detail

digitaltrends | January 21, 2019

We love giant tower computers. They’re big, bold, absurd, and we frankly prefer our computers to look more like an alien monolith than a useful piece of modern technology. Yet our way of thinking is certainly on the out. Computers continue to shrink in size as they grow in power.Which brings us to the Origin Chronos. The smallest desktop PC in the company’s line-up, the Chronos measures a bit less than a foot tall, four inches wide, and about 14 inches deep. That’s smaller than most A/V receivers, or about the size of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. It offers full-fat performance despite that. Our review unit came packing a Core i9-9900K and Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti, surely more than enough to please.Maybe the question is no longer “why should I buy a small desktop?” Maybe it’s now “why should I buy anything but?”

Read More

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