Exploring the Titanic in Virtual Reality

| October 8, 2018

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The golden rule for creating compelling VR content is that you should allow people to experience something that would be either impossible or too dangerous, expensive and/or difficult to do in real life. And by offering up the double-whammy of traveling back to 1912 to watch the RMS Titanic sinking into the cold dark waters of the Atlantic, then letting you explore the wreck which now lies 12,500 feet below the surface, Titanic VR certainly ticks those boxes in spades.The game was produced by Immersive VR Education (IVRE) a VR/AR developing studio based in Ireland which previously released the award-winning Apollo 11 VR moon landing experience 2016 and more recently completed a VR experience commissioned by the BBC commemorating the 100th anniversary of the RAF 1943: Berlin Blitz

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Mystic Video, Inc.

Mystic Video delivers Video Transcoding Solutions for IPTV and OTT video distribution. Our products deliver the highest channel density with lowest price per channel.The Mystic team is a group of veteran broadcast industry leaders whose previous products power many major Broadcast Operators’ systems. Mystic’s experience in digital video coding, transformation, and real-time system design produces equipment with the highest video quality, transcoding performance, and 24/7 operation. The new Mystic Smart Transcoder architecture surpasses old ASIC transcoders and future-proofs all IP delivery needs

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Mystic Video, Inc.

Mystic Video delivers Video Transcoding Solutions for IPTV and OTT video distribution. Our products deliver the highest channel density with lowest price per channel.The Mystic team is a group of veteran broadcast industry leaders whose previous products power many major Broadcast Operators’ systems. Mystic’s experience in digital video coding, transformation, and real-time system design produces equipment with the highest video quality, transcoding performance, and 24/7 operation. The new Mystic Smart Transcoder architecture surpasses old ASIC transcoders and future-proofs all IP delivery needs

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