Navigating the Shift Helping Media & Entertainment Companies Succeed

April 26, 2016

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While it is often said that content is king in the media industry today, it’s consumers themselves who are really in control, with constantly evolving preferences and demands. Managing today’s media supply chain effectively, from creation to consumption, means adapting quickly to new content distribution opportunities, new format and localization needs, multiple mobile device platforms, and more.It’s an ecosystem that cannot afford to stand still. Instead, individual components need to be continually adjusted, refined or repurposed to meet current business demands and to absorb new capabilities in line with evolving consumer expectations.

Spotlight

Warm Springs Productions

The Warm Springs Productions team has over 30 years of comprehensive experience in the television entertainment business. Collectively, our award-winning team has produced thousands of hours of television airing across a wide variety of networks including History Channel, Travel Channel, Discovery Science ESPN2, Outdoor Channel and Sportsman Channel.

OTHER ARTICLES
MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

Why video streaming needs to stop fighting the last consumer war

Article | May 28, 2021

Video streaming services have achieved mainstream engagement, with binge viewing now eclipsing linear TV viewing as the leading form of TV show consumption. While the digital disruptors may revel in their newfound status as the masters of TV consumption, and the TV and film industry are forced to adapt to this new reality, a subtler shift in mindset needs to occur. Streaming services, led by subscription video on demand (SVOD) hegemon Netflix, still operate in the mindset of having a digital native consumer base. For these streaming incumbents, the success of SVOD still rests upon their ability to appeal to younger consumer bases who have a) grown up in a digital environment, and b) are by definition young and eager for new and constantly evolving consumer experiences. Add to this the post-second world war presumption that popular entertainment should always be youth-centric focused, and streaming is still de-facto a youth-orientated proposition.

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MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

Hi-Res audio: It’s all about a maturing market

Article | May 21, 2021

Music streaming contrasts sharply with video streaming. While the video marketplace is characterised by unique catalogues, a variety of pricing and diverse value propositions music streaming services are all at their core fundamentally the same product. When the market was in its hyper-growth phase and there were enough new users to go around, it did not matter too much that the streaming services only had branding, curation and interface to differentiate themselves from each other. Now that we are approaching a slowdown in the high-revenue developed markets, more is needed. Which is where Hi-Res comes in.

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VIRTUALIZATION

This time Amazon really does have Bond in its sights

Article | May 20, 2021

MGM, which holds the largest film and TV library in Hollywood, is finally in play – and likely to be acquired by tech major and video streaming behemoth Amazon. With a rumoured price tag of $9 billion, the deal, while substantial, is merely equivalent to 8.3% of Amazon’s Q1 2021 earnings of $108.5 billion. Indeed, the 44% year-on-year (YoY) increase for its Q1 results alone would pay for the deal more than four times over. When it comes to investment capital to deploy, the tech majors led by Amazon and Apple are in a financial class of their own. This is the kind of deal that helps to explain why AT&T was so keen cut its losses and incur a $66 billion loss on its Warner Media assets by merging the former Time Warner media major with Discovery for $43 billion in cash and receiving 71% in equity in the new combined entity in return. It also follows on from Amazon’s 15.4x increase in what it is willing to pay to secure exclusive NFL Thursday Night Football coverage for its US Amazon Prime customers.

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MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

FILM PRODUCERS FLIP BARGAINING TABLE WITH UNIONIZING EFFORT

Article | May 21, 2021

Movie producers often find themselves negotiating with talent and crew members, and/or their production union representatives, over pay and benefits. But a group of 108 producers flipped the script Thursday in announcing they were looking to form a union of their own.Higher minimum pay and health benefits were cited as the two major reasons. While the group, called the Producers Union, boasts some heavy hitters such as Chris Moore (Manchester by the Sea) and Rebecca Green (It Follows), they made it clear that the traditional image of a Hollywood producer is misleading. Many are just getting by, project to project, looking for a breakout hit to up their quote. According to a survey released this year, 41% of producers made less than $25,000 in the pre-pandemic boom times of 2019. The Producers Union has developed a constitution with provisions for dues and diversity initiatives, with the aim of eventually negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with distributors and other film financiers. Previous efforts by producers to unionize have been thwarted by the courts and the National Labor Relations Board, according to Variety, as the NLRB saw them as supervisors and employers – which creates a high barrier to organizing.

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Spotlight

Warm Springs Productions

The Warm Springs Productions team has over 30 years of comprehensive experience in the television entertainment business. Collectively, our award-winning team has produced thousands of hours of television airing across a wide variety of networks including History Channel, Travel Channel, Discovery Science ESPN2, Outdoor Channel and Sportsman Channel.

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