7 more things non-media brands can learn from entertainment marketing

| July 4, 2017

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Back in March I shared 9 lessons for brands outside the media sector from the PromaxBDA Europe event. (PromaxBDA is the global community of marketers and creative people working in entertainment). Well, last month, the roadshow moved to Los Angeles and over 3,000 delegates from across the globe gathered at PromaxBDA’s annual North America conference.

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Warner Bros. Entertainment Group of Companies

Time Warner Inc., a global leader in media and entertainment with businesses in television networks, film and TV entertainment, uses its industry-leading operating scale and brands to create, package and deliver high-quality content worldwide through multiple distribution outlets.

OTHER ARTICLES

Sony clarifies that PS5 will support ‘overwhelming majority’ of PS4 games

Article | March 22, 2020

Sony has issued an update to clarify its stance on backwards compatibility for the PlayStation 5, saying the upcoming console will support an “overwhelming majority” of the 4,000-plus existing PS4 titles. Prior to the update, Sony’s Mark Cerny, the system architect for the PS5 who detailed its full hardware specifications in a live-streamed presentation on Wednesday, said the console would support “almost all” of the top 100 PS4 titles. “A quick update on backward compatibility — With all of the amazing games in PS4’s catalog, we’ve devoted significant efforts to enable our fans to play their favorites on PS5,” Sony writes in the update text, which it posted at the top of its tech specs announcement post from two days ago.

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Netflix versus Amazon Prime Video – depth versus breadth

Article | June 10, 2021

The first half of 2021 has been a year of continued change and disruption for subscription video. The global incumbent subscription video on demand (SVOD) leaders, Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, have been busy signalling to the financial markets how they intend to entrench their market dominance in light of the ongoing market acquisition pushes unleashed by the D2C disruptors following the D2C ‘big bang’ moment of Q4 2019 – Q2 2021. Netflix announced in January that it was no longer going to borrow on the financial markets to fund its day-to-day operations – specifically for its content acquisition budget, which is now driven predominately by commissioning original content for its service. This leaves the SVOD leader with $14.9 billion of outstanding long-term debt to service as it seeks to live within its means by commissioning future content from its ongoing cashflow. In Q1 2021 alone Netflix spent $500 million on servicing this debt pile versus $1.7 billion in net income generated over the same period.

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The Future of Tech: Gaming Consoles, the Xbox and PlayStation of Tomorrow

Article | February 10, 2020

Consoles have come a very long way since the arrival of first-generation machines from Atari and Coleco in the seventies. Even the original PlayStation (1994) and Xbox (2001) look dated compared to the 4K/HDR-capable machines of today, and that divide will grow even larger once the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X arrive at the end of 2020. But what about the future? More than once console makers have tried to break new ground, by focusing on functionality beyond gaming, but for the most part those attempts have failed. Nintendo has found the most success with specialized hardware that still focuses on games first, while Sony and Microsoft have seemingly understood that building powerful general purpose machines that are akin to PCs is their best and safest bet.

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Sony reportedly battling to keep PlayStation 5 price down

Article | February 13, 2020

Sony is struggling to land on a price for its upcoming PlayStation 5 console, according to a new report by Bloomberg, with component shortages potentially pushing the MSRP beyond that of the PS4. The bill of materials is said to be at around $450 right now, compared to IHS Markit’s estimate of $381 for the PS4, which sold for $399 upon its release in 2013. Unless Sony is willing to sell the PS5 at a loss, a $450 build cost would make the new console significantly more expensive than Sony’s current $399 PS4 Pro, which is often discounted to as low as $299. It was once common for consoles to be sold as loss leaders, but Sony designed the PS4 to be profitable from the start after losing billions on the technically ambitious PS3 at launch.

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Spotlight

Warner Bros. Entertainment Group of Companies

Time Warner Inc., a global leader in media and entertainment with businesses in television networks, film and TV entertainment, uses its industry-leading operating scale and brands to create, package and deliver high-quality content worldwide through multiple distribution outlets.

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