A.I. musicians are a growing trend. What does that mean for the music industry?

October 5, 2019

In its own words dedicated to “building the next generation of virtual entertainers,” Auxuman dropped its debut album on September 27th. From here, it promises to bring out new A.I.-generated albums each month, uploaded to YouTube, Soundcloud, and assorted streaming platforms. Forget about video killing the radio star, could A.I. be about to (hopefully not literally) kill the flesh-and-blood musician?  Before this goes any further, don’t worry: You’re not hopelessly out of touch with today’s pop music. Yona, Mony, Gemini, and the rest of the bunch aren’t real musicians. Well, at least not in the sense that you could meet them and shake their hands. They’re A.I. personalities, each with their own characters and genres, which have been created by Auxuman, an artificial intelligence startup based in London.

Spotlight

MultiChoice

MultiChoice is a leading entertainment company and we’re home to some of the most recognised brands on the continent (DStv, M-Net, SuperSport, Showmax and GOtv). We’re driven by a desire to enrich lives; to make a difference to the communities and countries where we operate. Through our commitment to local content, we’re able to bring African storytelling to a global audience – and we do this through innovative technology that brings the magic to our customers wherever they are, on whatever device they’re using.MultiChoice is part of the Video Entertainment segment of Naspers; a broad-based, multinational media and internet group headquartered in Cape Town, South Africa. The group operates in almost 50 countries in Africa. Its holding company, Naspers, is listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) and has an ADR listing on the London Stock Exchange (LSE). International investors account for around 50% of its shareholder base.

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MultiChoice is a leading entertainment company and we’re home to some of the most recognised brands on the continent (DStv, M-Net, SuperSport, Showmax and GOtv). We’re driven by a desire to enrich lives; to make a difference to the communities and countries where we operate. Through our commitment to local content, we’re able to bring African storytelling to a global audience – and we do this through innovative technology that brings the magic to our customers wherever they are, on whatever device they’re using.MultiChoice is part of the Video Entertainment segment of Naspers; a broad-based, multinational media and internet group headquartered in Cape Town, South Africa. The group operates in almost 50 countries in Africa. Its holding company, Naspers, is listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) and has an ADR listing on the London Stock Exchange (LSE). International investors account for around 50% of its shareholder base.

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