British Airways will give you VR for in-flight entertainment

| August 17, 2019

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Commercial virtual reality has, so far, mostly manifested itself in the living rooms of people with lots of disposable income. But British Airways is hopping on a VR bandwagon that could actually be pretty useful. The UK airline announced Wednesday that it would start offering VR headsets in a trial capacity to select passengers on flights. The trial lasts through the end of 2019 and has a fairly limited scope; you need to be in first class flying from London Heathrow airport to New York's JFK. Anyone who fits the criteria will be able to watch movies or engage in therapeutic VR experiences, per the British Airways press release. As long as you don't mind being totally unaware of your surroundings, that could be a nice way to spend a trans-Atlantic flight. In fact, that might be the point for those who aren't big fans of flying.

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