Cloud-Based Gaming Could Kick Off Huge Developer Race

NICK KOLAKOWSKI | December 30, 2019

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As we progress into a new decade, two things are clear: The biggest names in tech are really interested in cloud-based gaming, and they’re clearly willing to spend lots of money for any sort of market advantage. Earlier this month, Google purchased Typhoon Studios, the developer of the buzzed-about game “Journey to the Savage Planet” .Google is betting quite a bit on its Stadia platform, which streams high-profile games to players without a console; although the technology behind this streaming has attracted a lot of attention, many gamers are skeptical that Google can deliver experiences that can compete with traditional console-makers such as Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony.

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More and more, consumers expect to watch video content both linear and on demand , on an increasing range of different playback devices. At the same time, technology marches on, competition is increasing and it's becoming harder to predict where TV and video will head next.

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