Cross-Process Synchronization Improves VR Performance

| July 30, 2018

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The modern VR rendering pipeline involves multiple steps broadly categorized as rendering and post processing. Post rendering, the HMD compositor processes the rendered views to better suit the characteristics of the display and to compensate for pose latency before the textures are displayed. Figure 1 illustrates the process flow. This post discusses cross-process synchronization, NVIDIA’s API to improve overall VR performance.Figure 2 outlines a typical scheduling model adopted where frames rendered by the VR game process are composited by the VR compositor process before they are flipped to the display.

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iNDEMAND is an innovative partnership between Comcast, Charter Communications and Cox. We distribute premium VOD & PPV entertainment to more than 200 North American TV operators, with a reach of over 60 million homes.

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