Epic’s New SDK Could Make Cross-Platform Multiplayer Easier For Developers

| December 12, 2018

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Epic Games today announced it will be releasing a free cross-platform networking software development kit (SDK) for games. The SDK will allow developers to leverage the same server infrastructure used by Fortnite, for free.Players will use the same login as Fortnite and the new Epic Games store, so for many gamers no new account would need to be created.Currently, VR developers can leverage each platform’s multiplayer networking system for free, but developing a cross-platform solution requires hosting or renting servers. For example, a developer can add multiplayer to an Oculus Store title for free. However, if they wanted their Oculus players to play with their Daydream players, they’d have to do this at their own expense. The same situation applies to Steam and PlayStation.This leads many developers of multiplayer VR games to either release on only one platform, or to have separate multiplayer pools. But Epic’s solution could change this as it would give developers a free and reliable solution to scale their mulitplayer across multiple platforms.

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