MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

FILM PRODUCERS FLIP BARGAINING TABLE WITH UNIONIZING EFFORT

| May 21, 2021

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Movie producers often find themselves negotiating with talent and crew members, and/or their production union representatives, over pay and benefits. But a group of 108 producers flipped the script Thursday in announcing they were looking to form a union of their own.Higher minimum pay and health benefits were cited as the two major reasons.

While the group, called the Producers Union, boasts some heavy hitters such as Chris Moore (Manchester by the Sea) and Rebecca Green (It Follows), they made it clear that the traditional image of a Hollywood producer is misleading. Many are just getting by, project to project, looking for a breakout hit to up their quote. According to a survey released this year, 41% of producers made less than $25,000 in the pre-pandemic boom times of 2019.

The Producers Union has developed a constitution with provisions for dues and diversity initiatives, with the aim of eventually negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with distributors and other film financiers. Previous efforts by producers to unionize have been thwarted by the courts and the National Labor Relations Board, according to Variety, as the NLRB saw them as supervisors and employers – which creates a high barrier to organizing.

Spotlight

Legion M Entertainment, Inc.

Legion M is a fan-owned entertainment company that partners with filmmakers and Hollywood studios to produce original movies, TV shows, VR experiences and more. We provide development support, financial backing, marketing muscle and, most importantly, fan engagement and monetization.We're the first entertainment company in history built from the ground up to be owned by fans! With the help of the JOBS Act, we're opening the gates of Hollywood and giving fans a first-ever opportunity to own and participate in a production company.

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