Gaming as a Service? And a Gaming ETF (HERO) emerges

October 31, 2019

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Got Gaas? There’s a lot of buzz in the games industry about “Cloud gaming” and for good reason. With tech giant Google about to launch its Stadia service November 18th, cloud gaming is  poised to change the fundamentals of how the game industry works. Meanwhile, back in the world of finance, gaming is being taken seriously, as seen with the October 29th launch of the HERO ETF by GLOBAL X. Twenty years ago, PC gamers would physically go to a store to purchase a box with discs. Get home, install the game and you’re good to go. Since then, the game industry has moved more and more towards offering game software as a download. The benefit was the software was you didn’t need a store visit and your purchase tied to your platform account (be it Steam, Origin, Uplay, Battlenet, etc).

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Imagine Communications

Every minute of every day, Imagine Communications’ customers create millions of media moments all over the world. Moments that inform, entertain and change the way we experience the world. At Imagine Communications, we develop the technologies that enable our customers to deliver all these moments. Anywhere, anytime, on any device.With more than five decades in broadcast, I guess you could say that media technology is our life. We developed the first broadcast video server to support 1080p. Provided the first HD instant replay for the NFL.

OTHER ARTICLES

How blockchain is transforming online gaming for players

Article | June 18, 2020

For online gamers, in-game purchases made to buy special swords, guns, or other add-ons to play their adventure, warfare, and other games are one-time, non-transferable investments that lock them into their pretend worlds. That's something companies like Polyient Games want to change by registering those purchases using blockchain and transforming the previously one-way transactions into liquid assets which are transferable for cash.

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VR Headsets of the Future Might Be Made With Mirrors?

Article | June 4, 2020

Do you get headaches or feel nauseous while using VR headsets? About 20% of people do. Even if VR headsets don’t cause you physical discomfort, you might feel that your virtual worlds seem flat..That’s because they are flat. VR headsets using close-to-eye displays rely on lenses. While a lot of cool technology goes into them, they really work a lot like television or computer screens. Advancements like eye-tracking and autofocus try to fix these problems. But, they’ll never work. At least not according to Doug Magyari. Magyari and Immy, his company based in Troy, Michigan, believe that they have the solution: VR headsets that don’t use lenses.

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MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

How to Watch Netflix in Virtual Reality

Article | April 20, 2021

Playing virtual reality video games is a blast—but it also takes work. If you simply want to kick back, relax, and experience some mind-bending visuals without thinking too much, why not try watching Netflix in VR? It's ridiculously easy to do, even if you don't have state-of-the-art equipment. There are three primary methods, depending on what kind of device you're working with: fire up the Netflix VR app on Android, set up mirroring with your iPhone, or simply download the Netflix app from your preferred Oculus device. Here's What You'll Need VR headset: No matter your budget, there's a virtual reality option for you. On the pricey end, there are sophisticated VR headsets like the Oculus Quest 2, which starts at $299, and the HTC Vive Pro Eye, which retails for $799. We've included a few other options in the gallery below, too. If you're looking for something less expensive, there's the $99 Google Daydream View system (discontinued, but you can still find them here and there), the Samsung Gear VR headset (which the manufacturer has also discontinued in the U.S., but you can find it on Amazon for $128), and the $25 Google Cardboard viewer (although you may want to purchase an additional head strap for it).

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VIRTUALIZATION

Netflix versus Amazon Prime Video – depth versus breadth

Article | June 10, 2021

The first half of 2021 has been a year of continued change and disruption for subscription video. The global incumbent subscription video on demand (SVOD) leaders, Netflix and Amazon Prime Video, have been busy signalling to the financial markets how they intend to entrench their market dominance in light of the ongoing market acquisition pushes unleashed by the D2C disruptors following the D2C ‘big bang’ moment of Q4 2019 – Q2 2021. Netflix announced in January that it was no longer going to borrow on the financial markets to fund its day-to-day operations – specifically for its content acquisition budget, which is now driven predominately by commissioning original content for its service. This leaves the SVOD leader with $14.9 billion of outstanding long-term debt to service as it seeks to live within its means by commissioning future content from its ongoing cashflow. In Q1 2021 alone Netflix spent $500 million on servicing this debt pile versus $1.7 billion in net income generated over the same period.

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Spotlight

Imagine Communications

Every minute of every day, Imagine Communications’ customers create millions of media moments all over the world. Moments that inform, entertain and change the way we experience the world. At Imagine Communications, we develop the technologies that enable our customers to deliver all these moments. Anywhere, anytime, on any device.With more than five decades in broadcast, I guess you could say that media technology is our life. We developed the first broadcast video server to support 1080p. Provided the first HD instant replay for the NFL.

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