GeForce RTX Propels PC Gaming’s Golden Age with Real-Time Ray Tracing

August 20, 2018

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NVIDIA today unveiled the biggest breakthrough in PC gaming in over a decade: the GeForce RTX series, based on the Turing GPU architecture, which realizes the dream of real-time ray tracing. It’s a watershed moment, the start of a golden age of gaming. And the technology — regarded as the “holy grail” of computer graphics — has come 10 years earlier than most predicted.“Games will never be the same,” said Jensen Huang, NVIDIA founder and CEO, during his Gamescom presentation, where he unveiled GeForce RTX.Graphics are advancing at 10x the rate of Moore’s law, before it ends. Propelling this are architectural advancements, which are responsible for GeForce RTX’s huge leap.

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Content is everything the business creates in order to communicate. In today’s world, the way we communicate is the only thing that separates us from the next: The next click, the next competitor, the next answer. TCA – The Content Advisory is a consulting and training company; blending the art and science of intelligent content to help today’s modern business communication’s strategy.

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Spotlight

The Content Advisory

Content is everything the business creates in order to communicate. In today’s world, the way we communicate is the only thing that separates us from the next: The next click, the next competitor, the next answer. TCA – The Content Advisory is a consulting and training company; blending the art and science of intelligent content to help today’s modern business communication’s strategy.

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