How The Cloud is Changing the Entertainment Industry

| December 14, 2017

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The Cloud is everywhere on the Internet, just like the clouds in the sky. We can’t actually live without it. Whether it’s to back-up some important files, listen to music or to watch a movie in the week end for a cheap cost, we turn to the Cloud. There was a time when we used to walk down miles just to rent a CD or a DVD. But, now you can enjoy watching a movie, or music without leaving the couch, thanks to services like Netflix, Spotify, Hulu and many more.

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TheBlaze

TheBlaze is the digital network that provides a platform for a new generation of authentic and unfiltered voices. TheBlaze serves millions of people every day through TheBlaze.com, TheBlaze Mobile, Roku, Amazon Fire, Sling TV, Apple TV, TheBlaze Radio Network and leading cable and satellite television providers, including Verizon FiOS and DISH Network.

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Spotlight

TheBlaze

TheBlaze is the digital network that provides a platform for a new generation of authentic and unfiltered voices. TheBlaze serves millions of people every day through TheBlaze.com, TheBlaze Mobile, Roku, Amazon Fire, Sling TV, Apple TV, TheBlaze Radio Network and leading cable and satellite television providers, including Verizon FiOS and DISH Network.

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