How The NBA Is Using Virtual Reality And Augmented Reality To Get Fans Closer To The Action

| March 15, 2019

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On the Saturday night of All-Star weekend in Charlotte, there's a room in a side hallway deep within the bowels of the Spectrum Center where the floors and walls are completely black.As we enter the room about 15 minutes before the start of the evening's events, the first person we see is Stephen Curry, posing for photos with Dirk Nowitzki and the rest of the 3-point contest participants. Before you know it, hometown hero Kemba Walker is casually spinning a basketball, and players are being quickly and carefully whisked in and out of the room until the slam dunk contest participants are put through different poses and paces.

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Netflix is the world's leading internet entertainment service with 125 million memberships in over 190 countries enjoying TV series, documentaries and feature films across a wide variety of genres and languages. Members can watch as much as they want, anytime, anywhere, on any internet-connected screen. Members can play, pause and resume watching, all without commercials or commitments.

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