How the scope for startups to experiment with VR is expanding

October 20, 2019

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The hype over virtual reality (VR) has largely been belied so far because of challenges to its adoption. Headsets were either too expensive or too poor in their visual quality. The bulkiness of headsets and their rendering of VR worlds sometimes produced sickening experiences. A headset tethered to a PC restricted movement. It also required a high performance gaming PC with an expensive graphic chip that could render a frame rate suitable to the human eye. If the frame rate drops, the viewer starts feeling sick. Phone-based VR, like Google Daydream and Samsung Gear, haven’t gone beyond simple use cases because of limited mobile computing power and battery life. But last month’s launch of Oculus Quest has got the VR community buzzing again. Firstly, it’s a tether-free, “all-in-one" VR headset, with all the computation and rendering happening within the headset, which means it need not be wired to a PC. “Now you’re free to walk around with just the headset.

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Kabam

Kabam is an entertainment company that is one of the world’s leaders of AAA console quality games for mobile devices. Kabam’s leadership team is unparalleled in the industry, with executives from some of best global companies in entertainment, games, media, consumer goods, internet and enterprise software.

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BUSINESS

The rise of the introverted salesperson

Article | May 25, 2021

The shift to virtual selling has upended the status quo for many sales teams across the country and around the world. I firmly believe, as I’ve said before, thatnearly everything can be sold over video— and in many ways the virtual sales process makes it easier for sales reps to connect with customers and build trust.Still, there has been a great deal of resistance, and some organizations have just tried to wait it out, hoping that once COVID passed, they could go back to normal.

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20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY

Article | April 20, 2020

Considering Atlanta is known for its status as a burgeoning entertainment capital, it’s no surprise that the city boasts a large number of gaming professionals. According to reports, the video game market in America was estimated at $17.69 billion in 2016, with the global market valued at $75 billion that same year. Esports in particular have increased in popularity, leading to the rise of games like “Fortnite,” “League of Legends” and “Overwatch.”

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MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

The new chair of the FTC and antitrust 2.0

Article | June 22, 2021

The appointment of Lina Khan on June 15th to chair of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is poised to be a transformational one in the history of the world wide web. Khan came to prominence with an article in the Yale Law Journal, Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox, which identified the paradox of hegemonic tech service providers which bypass the US’ strict competition laws by offering lower prices to the end consumer. Under US antitrust law, the driving indicator of market monopolies are higher prices for the consumer – under this strict definition, none of the tech majors which dominate the digital economy are monopolistic. Indeed, some such as Alphabet and Facebook do not even directly charge the end user for their services. So, while both Google and Facebook dominate the global digital ad market, making an antitrust case against them under the current 20thcentury era regulatory framework is nigh on impossible. However, the absence of meaningful competitive challengers to these two incumbents in search and social advertising over the previous 15 years, despite the lucrative high margin business opportunities, implies that the competitive market is not performing according to classical economic theory. Khan has built a subsequent career on trying to square this circle, and now the Biden Administration has empowered her as the key instigator of the sweeping regulatory update required for a digital-first century.

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MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

FILM PRODUCERS FLIP BARGAINING TABLE WITH UNIONIZING EFFORT

Article | May 21, 2021

Movie producers often find themselves negotiating with talent and crew members, and/or their production union representatives, over pay and benefits. But a group of 108 producers flipped the script Thursday in announcing they were looking to form a union of their own.Higher minimum pay and health benefits were cited as the two major reasons. While the group, called the Producers Union, boasts some heavy hitters such as Chris Moore (Manchester by the Sea) and Rebecca Green (It Follows), they made it clear that the traditional image of a Hollywood producer is misleading. Many are just getting by, project to project, looking for a breakout hit to up their quote. According to a survey released this year, 41% of producers made less than $25,000 in the pre-pandemic boom times of 2019. The Producers Union has developed a constitution with provisions for dues and diversity initiatives, with the aim of eventually negotiating a collective bargaining agreement with distributors and other film financiers. Previous efforts by producers to unionize have been thwarted by the courts and the National Labor Relations Board, according to Variety, as the NLRB saw them as supervisors and employers – which creates a high barrier to organizing.

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Spotlight

Kabam

Kabam is an entertainment company that is one of the world’s leaders of AAA console quality games for mobile devices. Kabam’s leadership team is unparalleled in the industry, with executives from some of best global companies in entertainment, games, media, consumer goods, internet and enterprise software.

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