Hundreds of Trillions of Pixels: NVIDIA and RED Digital Cinema Solve 8K Bottleneck

For discerning households, 4K video resolution is becoming the new gold standard. But in professional circles, the real glitter is on 8K.This ultra-high HD standard provides stunning clarity on large screens, where pixels aren’t visible even from inches away.But it takes massive computing muscle to power that capability and that’s a task our revolutionary Turing GPU architecture and new Quadro RTX GPUs are perfect for.State-of-the-art cameras can capture 8K video (which contains four times the pixels of 4K), but those pixels can create a massive computational logjam when editing footage.

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Compass Entertainment Complex

Compass Entertainment Center is a multi-purpose family entertainment center nestled in Virginia’s Northern Neck with various attractions, multi-screen movie cinema, and full-service restaurant.

OTHER ARTICLES
Technologies, Business

Watch out Warzone and Fortnite: Ubisoft is coming after free-to-play

Article | August 3, 2022

Ubisoft announced last week that it is adding specific focus on free-to-play, alongside its AAA catalogue. In doing so, it is following a route that has been very successful for Activision with its Warzone strategy. Free-to-play games which draw audiences via big franchise names and monetise via in-game spending are going to be increasingly common among AAA publishers. The focus on in-game spending and particularly on the cosmetic, rather than the progress-related, parts will be the key revenue component. As games become less finite and more perpetual (consumer goal is less about ‘finishing them’ and more and ‘playing/spending time in them’), the opportunity to monetise needs that stem from this perpetual engagement (e.g. socialising or expression) starts to outweigh the mere monetisation of access to a packaged product. Simultaneously, free-to-play games also act as a powerful marketing driver for AAA releases as they come out, as well as streamability and word of mouth for the franchise.

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Technologies, Virtualization

B2B Movie Placements: What to Expect?

Article | July 27, 2022

As films evolved into the popular medium that they are today, brands followed suit. They took advantage of a large network of new ways to market, from print media to radio to television. Product placement, a part of branded entertainment marketing, became more common from the 1980s. Today, every moviegoer is familiar – sometimes painfully – with paid product placements. And every marketer has heard commentary on both good and bad B2C product placements. But what about B2B movie placements? Ever heard of those? If you are a B2B enterprise looking to try it out, here are some major differences between B2C and B2B movie placements: Impress the producers Create an enticing pitch for the producers, which can influence them enough to bring them to the creative department. Sell your brand or product to them (indirectly) to help them understand how it will improve the realism of their scene or set. Make them realize how your product or service can help them. Placement isn’t always ‘placement’ Prospective B2B buyers aren’t going to squint their eyes to find your product while watching a movie. However, they might actually remember your brand if you host pre-opening events around the world for them and their families to watch a popular movie. If they enjoy the movie and establish an emotional connection with it, they will definitely think of you while making any kind of purchase decision. Things might not work out No matter how hard you try to show your brand in a good light in a certain scene or situation, sometimes things happen that you can't control or ignore. In such cases, you might have to get all the branding out instead of settling for negative publicity, which could be a viable option for a B2C brand. B2B Movie Placement: A Success Story FLIR, a client of Hollywood Branded, is the leading provider of thermal military camera equipment. It co-starred in one of Warner Brothers' biggest hits of 2018, Rampage. FLIR connected with the right member of the production team and ensured that the brand was pictured in a positive light. FLIR shared its technology with the filmmakers and got advertised to its business customers, mostly film-loving decision-makers, through the movie and the way it was shot. The film earned $427M at the worldwide box office.

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Virtualization, Media and Broadcasting

VR Headsets of the Future Might Be Made With Mirrors?

Article | July 13, 2022

Do you get headaches or feel nauseous while using VR headsets? About 20% of people do. Even if VR headsets don’t cause you physical discomfort, you might feel that your virtual worlds seem flat..That’s because they are flat. VR headsets using close-to-eye displays rely on lenses. While a lot of cool technology goes into them, they really work a lot like television or computer screens. Advancements like eye-tracking and autofocus try to fix these problems. But, they’ll never work. At least not according to Doug Magyari. Magyari and Immy, his company based in Troy, Michigan, believe that they have the solution: VR headsets that don’t use lenses.

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Technologies, Virtualization

Metaverse: Transforming B2B Businesses with Technology

Article | July 27, 2022

In the 3D interactive space of metaverse, nothing is impossible. People from various corners of the world can create, share, and explore virtual worlds in this space. They can also interact, trade, and do business. What does metaverse offer B2B businesses, though? Let us take a look. From Virtual Storefronts to Digital Employees While metaverse is still in the early stages of development, businesses can have their own virtual storefronts, digital employees, and virtual currency in a virtual reality. Business exclusive metaverse platforms like Sansar, Somnium Space, and Decentraland offer companies an option to establish their virtual presence. How is Metaverse Transforming B2B Businesses? Metaverse presents businesses with the unique opportunity to build client relationships face-to-face. Branded experiences like product announcements, product showrooms, company updates, educational sessions, conferences, and networking events can be done in metaverse. Let us explore other ways in which metaverse can enrich B2B businesses: Richer Customer Experience Immersive buyer experiences influence prospects to make purchase decisions faster. B2B sellers in metaverse can create such experiences through interactions that surpass traditional sales approaches and focus on visually attractive sales presentations to convert prospects. Effective Marketing and Advertising New marketing and advertising opportunities in metaverse are developing with every passing day. Over time, companies may be able to sponsor events or create targets ads to attract a certain demographic. The companies that establish themselves in the metaverse might have a bigger advantage in this regard compared to the companies that venture into it later. Higher ROI and Sales Increasing sales and ROI are crucial for every business. Reaching new markets and tapping into new revenue sources is easier with metaverse. It will allow salespeople to host multiple meetings with buyers living in different parts of the world without having to leave their actual office, saving multiple costs while conveniently still creating client relationships that last. Improved Workforce Efficiency Metaverse-based training simulations help employees upgrade their skills. Additionally, customer service associates can create avatars to provide business customers assistance in real-time. Metaverse encourages employees to communicate better and allows remote employees to virtually connect for projects, meetings, and feedback. Last Word B2B businesses can capitalize on the convenience of metaverse and harness this latest technology to offer their customers visually immersive experiences.

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Spotlight

Compass Entertainment Complex

Compass Entertainment Center is a multi-purpose family entertainment center nestled in Virginia’s Northern Neck with various attractions, multi-screen movie cinema, and full-service restaurant.

Related News

NVIDIA's Step in Data Centre Business Is a Success; Became as Big as Gaming

NVIDIA | May 25, 2020

NVIDIA Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue, NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers. NVIDIA has been stepping up its data center game for a while now. Last quarter's results indicate the effort has been worth it. Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year-over-year jump -- so big, in fact, that NVIDIA could justify pouring more time and resources into the market, now that it's proved it can do well in it. Data centers are the growth engine. For the three-month stretch ending on April 26, NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue into an adjusted per-share profit of $1.80. The top line was up 39% year over year, and adjusted earnings more than doubled from $0.88 per share in the prior-year quarter. Both numbers topped analysts' expectations, just as the company's revenue guidance for the current quarter did. That wasn't the most interesting aspect of NVIDIA's quarterly report, however. Far more intriguing was the $1.14 billion in data center technology sales. A year earlier, that figure was a much more modest $634 million. The quarterly tally trails gaming-related sales, which hit $1.34 billion for the first fiscal quarter, but ts data center business is growing much faster than any other segment. At its current pace, data center will overtake gaming as the company's biggest breadwinner. As history indicates, this is a fairly new development. Learn more: MICROGAMING COLLABORATES WITH INSPIRED ENTERTAINMENT TO ENHANCE GAMING EXPERIENCE . “NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business.” ~ Quant say News coverage of the numbers broadly suggested coronavirus-related lockdowns meant that companies were forced to improve their remote-work capabilities on the fly, generating demand for data center technology. And to be fair, the contagion likely did spur some fresh, unexpected demand. That's not how data centers usually work, though. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. The launch of the DGX A100 5-petaflop artificial intelligence (AI) system didn't happen until after the quarter began, but it was based on a design that was likely finalized before the COVID-19 outbreak. “NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers , though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. ” Ditto for Jarvis, an app platform that lets organizations tweak the use of AI in a variety of self-customized ways. It was launched last quarter, but prospective users are still kicking the tires. It can take months to just select and plan a data center's architecture. Enterprise customers didn't simply set up and pay for a data center in a matter of weeks. Ergo, if NVIDIA sold it last quarter, it was a sale that was apt to be set up well before the quarter began. To that end, one can readily see on the graphic above that data center sales had been ramping up for a couple of quarters even before the recently completed quarter got going. NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business Quant say it remains the clear leader in the graphics processing unit (GPU) market, which is NVIDIA's biggest business. It's a market worth fighting for. It's also worth noting that despite NVIDIA's data center growth last quarter, it still has only a small fraction of the data center computing market. Intel remains the powerhouse in the arena, leaning on its popular and more conventional data center technology -- based on central processing units (CPUs) -- to generate more than $23 billion in data center hardware revenue last year. NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers of tomorrow. Given the sales trajectory, though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. It's proved itself to be a player. It would be time (and effort) well spent. Market researcher Mordor Intelligence reports the size of the global GPU market was just under $21 billion as of last year, but the realization of GPUs as a powerful alternative to CPUs (particularly in AI) leads Mordor to conclude the GPU market will be worth more than $100 billion by 2024. Learn more: 20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY .

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Quake 2 is the best argument for Nvidia’s ray tracing

Venturebeat | January 22, 2019

If you want to see the potential of ray tracing, you should look to Quake 2. A new mod called Q2VKPT (Quake 2 with Vulkan path-tracing) is out now that adds real-time ray tracing to the classic shooter. And while Nvidia has turned to cutting-edge releases to hype people up for RTX, maybe it should use Quake 2 instead.In the 3-minute video above, you can see how effective RTX is at bringing a scene to life. White wall lamps reflect off of the floors. Explosions bathe the environment in momentary bursts of orange. And water reflects the entire room around it.All of this next-gen lighting tech is happening in a game that is from 1997. But RTX gives the world a sense of place and reality that looks almost modern. Sure, the enemy models are blocky and under animated, but they look like they are moving through physical space.

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Origin's Chronos PC is no looker, but it plays games with eye-popping detail

digitaltrends | January 21, 2019

We love giant tower computers. They’re big, bold, absurd, and we frankly prefer our computers to look more like an alien monolith than a useful piece of modern technology. Yet our way of thinking is certainly on the out. Computers continue to shrink in size as they grow in power.Which brings us to the Origin Chronos. The smallest desktop PC in the company’s line-up, the Chronos measures a bit less than a foot tall, four inches wide, and about 14 inches deep. That’s smaller than most A/V receivers, or about the size of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. It offers full-fat performance despite that. Our review unit came packing a Core i9-9900K and Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti, surely more than enough to please.Maybe the question is no longer “why should I buy a small desktop?” Maybe it’s now “why should I buy anything but?”

Read More

NVIDIA's Step in Data Centre Business Is a Success; Became as Big as Gaming

NVIDIA | May 25, 2020

NVIDIA Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue, NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers. NVIDIA has been stepping up its data center game for a while now. Last quarter's results indicate the effort has been worth it. Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year-over-year jump -- so big, in fact, that NVIDIA could justify pouring more time and resources into the market, now that it's proved it can do well in it. Data centers are the growth engine. For the three-month stretch ending on April 26, NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue into an adjusted per-share profit of $1.80. The top line was up 39% year over year, and adjusted earnings more than doubled from $0.88 per share in the prior-year quarter. Both numbers topped analysts' expectations, just as the company's revenue guidance for the current quarter did. That wasn't the most interesting aspect of NVIDIA's quarterly report, however. Far more intriguing was the $1.14 billion in data center technology sales. A year earlier, that figure was a much more modest $634 million. The quarterly tally trails gaming-related sales, which hit $1.34 billion for the first fiscal quarter, but ts data center business is growing much faster than any other segment. At its current pace, data center will overtake gaming as the company's biggest breadwinner. As history indicates, this is a fairly new development. Learn more: MICROGAMING COLLABORATES WITH INSPIRED ENTERTAINMENT TO ENHANCE GAMING EXPERIENCE . “NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business.” ~ Quant say News coverage of the numbers broadly suggested coronavirus-related lockdowns meant that companies were forced to improve their remote-work capabilities on the fly, generating demand for data center technology. And to be fair, the contagion likely did spur some fresh, unexpected demand. That's not how data centers usually work, though. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. The launch of the DGX A100 5-petaflop artificial intelligence (AI) system didn't happen until after the quarter began, but it was based on a design that was likely finalized before the COVID-19 outbreak. “NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers , though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. ” Ditto for Jarvis, an app platform that lets organizations tweak the use of AI in a variety of self-customized ways. It was launched last quarter, but prospective users are still kicking the tires. It can take months to just select and plan a data center's architecture. Enterprise customers didn't simply set up and pay for a data center in a matter of weeks. Ergo, if NVIDIA sold it last quarter, it was a sale that was apt to be set up well before the quarter began. To that end, one can readily see on the graphic above that data center sales had been ramping up for a couple of quarters even before the recently completed quarter got going. NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business Quant say it remains the clear leader in the graphics processing unit (GPU) market, which is NVIDIA's biggest business. It's a market worth fighting for. It's also worth noting that despite NVIDIA's data center growth last quarter, it still has only a small fraction of the data center computing market. Intel remains the powerhouse in the arena, leaning on its popular and more conventional data center technology -- based on central processing units (CPUs) -- to generate more than $23 billion in data center hardware revenue last year. NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers of tomorrow. Given the sales trajectory, though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. It's proved itself to be a player. It would be time (and effort) well spent. Market researcher Mordor Intelligence reports the size of the global GPU market was just under $21 billion as of last year, but the realization of GPUs as a powerful alternative to CPUs (particularly in AI) leads Mordor to conclude the GPU market will be worth more than $100 billion by 2024. Learn more: 20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY .

Read More

Quake 2 is the best argument for Nvidia’s ray tracing

Venturebeat | January 22, 2019

If you want to see the potential of ray tracing, you should look to Quake 2. A new mod called Q2VKPT (Quake 2 with Vulkan path-tracing) is out now that adds real-time ray tracing to the classic shooter. And while Nvidia has turned to cutting-edge releases to hype people up for RTX, maybe it should use Quake 2 instead.In the 3-minute video above, you can see how effective RTX is at bringing a scene to life. White wall lamps reflect off of the floors. Explosions bathe the environment in momentary bursts of orange. And water reflects the entire room around it.All of this next-gen lighting tech is happening in a game that is from 1997. But RTX gives the world a sense of place and reality that looks almost modern. Sure, the enemy models are blocky and under animated, but they look like they are moving through physical space.

Read More

Origin's Chronos PC is no looker, but it plays games with eye-popping detail

digitaltrends | January 21, 2019

We love giant tower computers. They’re big, bold, absurd, and we frankly prefer our computers to look more like an alien monolith than a useful piece of modern technology. Yet our way of thinking is certainly on the out. Computers continue to shrink in size as they grow in power.Which brings us to the Origin Chronos. The smallest desktop PC in the company’s line-up, the Chronos measures a bit less than a foot tall, four inches wide, and about 14 inches deep. That’s smaller than most A/V receivers, or about the size of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. It offers full-fat performance despite that. Our review unit came packing a Core i9-9900K and Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti, surely more than enough to please.Maybe the question is no longer “why should I buy a small desktop?” Maybe it’s now “why should I buy anything but?”

Read More

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