In Sync at CES: Announcing G-SYNC Compatible Monitors and BFGD Pre-Orders

| January 6, 2019

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We’re displaying for keeps at CES this week in Las Vegas with the expansion of the G-SYNC ecosystem, pre-orders of our new BFGD monitors and the announcement of new G-SYNC displays.These announcements build on our ongoing investment in G-SYNC display technology, which has delivered superior gaming experiences since 2013.The revolutionary monitor technology introduced gamers to smooth variable refresh rate gameplay, with no screen tearing and no V-Sync input lag.We then brought G-SYNC to laptops in 2015 and, last year, we announced we’re bringing it to living rooms and dens with the BFGD displays.These announcements build on our ongoing investment in G-SYNC display technology, which has delivered superior gaming experiences since 2013.

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FOXMEDIA COMMUNICATION

we offer the experience of the most value added names and labels, insuring a unique and exclusive access to first category material.who specialise in geo-targeted, language specific and platform tailored, premium contents.a global network of specialists suppliers and a proven footprint in increasing revenues by an average of 30% for our clients.

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