Intro to the Industry: The difference between esports and gaming

| September 12, 2019

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Gaming is simply the act of playing a game. This makes the term “gaming” an all-encompassing word that includes anyone who is in the act of playing a game. Keep in mind that gaming does not include the gambling industry, though. A helpful analogy might be to think of the word “gaming” as equivalent to the word “sports.” Much like how “sports” encompasses soccer, football, hockey, baseball, and more, “gaming” includes a number of specific types of video games being played. Particularly large games include League of Legends (LoL), Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (CSGO), Hearthstone, and many, many more!

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Lionbridge partners with brands to break barriers and build bridges all over the world. For more than 20 years, we have helped companies connect with global customers by delivering marketing, testing and globalization services in more than 300 languages. Through our world-class platform, we orchestrate a network of 500,000 passionate experts in 5,000-plus cities, who partner with brands to create culturally rich experiences. Relentless in our love for linguistics, we use the best of human and machine intelligence to forge understanding that resonates with our customers’ customers. Based in Waltham, Mass., Lionbridge maintains solution centers in 27 countries.

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Article | March 10, 2020

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Article | March 1, 2020

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How to Watch Netflix in Virtual Reality

Article | April 20, 2021

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Spotlight

Lionbridge

Lionbridge partners with brands to break barriers and build bridges all over the world. For more than 20 years, we have helped companies connect with global customers by delivering marketing, testing and globalization services in more than 300 languages. Through our world-class platform, we orchestrate a network of 500,000 passionate experts in 5,000-plus cities, who partner with brands to create culturally rich experiences. Relentless in our love for linguistics, we use the best of human and machine intelligence to forge understanding that resonates with our customers’ customers. Based in Waltham, Mass., Lionbridge maintains solution centers in 27 countries.

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