Is All of Disney's Success Bad for the Entertainment Industry?

December 16, 2019

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Walt Disney always liked to remind people “I hope we never lose sight of one thing. It was all started by a mouse.” Now the mouse has grown so large it’s roaring like a lion. And Disney is at the top of the food chain. If you read an entertainment news story on this site, or any website for that matter, chances are at least 50/50 the article was about something related to Disney, be it Marvel, Star Wars or Disney’s home-grown properties. While Disney products are loved the world over, the Disney company itself faces increased criticism that its dominance is hurting the entertainment industry.

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Havas Sports & Entertainment

Part of HAVAS Media Group, our 35 offices in 20 markets, which include the Havas Sports & Entertainment and ignition agencies, together with our strategic partners Seven46, Benza and eventures, deliver strategically sound creative solutions based on insight, experience and a deep understanding of what binds people together into communities: shared passions.

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MEDIA AND BROADCASTING

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Spotlight

Havas Sports & Entertainment

Part of HAVAS Media Group, our 35 offices in 20 markets, which include the Havas Sports & Entertainment and ignition agencies, together with our strategic partners Seven46, Benza and eventures, deliver strategically sound creative solutions based on insight, experience and a deep understanding of what binds people together into communities: shared passions.

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