Multiplayer Shooter Warzone VR Hits Steam Early Access This Week

January 23, 2019

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Warzone VR from Sinn Studio (the same developers as VR games Wraith and The Perfect Sniper) is set to hit Steam Early Access for Rift, Vive, and Windows VR this week on January 25th. Billed as a large-scale VR FPS, similar to War Dust, there is a heavy focus on team-based gameplay and squad tactics.Originally slated for a Fall 2018 release the PC edition was moved back a bit to just now releasing in Early Access this week. A PSVR version is still planned, but details on that are light at the moment.Visually it reminds me a bit of Onward and is certainly far less polished than Contractors, which may very well be the best looking VR shooter we’ve seen to date from a pure graphical fidelity perspective. One aspect of Warzone that particularly stands out in the footage is the prevalence of vehicles. You can see in the latest trailer that all passengers actually see themselves inside a fully-modeled interior of the vehicle while driving instead of zooming the camera perspective out like War Dust does with its tanks.

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