Nvidia Reveals Titan RTX GPU With VirtualLink Port

Nvidia today announced its most powerful GPU yet, the beastly (literally) Titan RTX or, as it likes to call it, the T-Rex.The Titan range of Nvidia cards has traditionally eschewed cost concerns in favor of raw power, surpassing its line of GeForce GPUs. The same is true of this latest addition, which arrives following the launch of the RTX 2000 line earlier this year.Titan RTX using Nvidia’s Turing architecture and offers what a press release calls “130 teraflops of deep learning performance” as well as “11 GigaRays of ray-tracing performance”. The latter is a feature Nvidia widely touted with the launch of the RTX 2080 card earlier this year, bringing increased lighting effects to environments in games like Battlefield V. We’ve also seen ray-tracing used to render a Star Wars set with photorealism.

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Technologies, Business

Metaverse: Transforming B2B Businesses with Technology

Article | July 20, 2022

In the 3D interactive space of metaverse, nothing is impossible. People from various corners of the world can create, share, and explore virtual worlds in this space. They can also interact, trade, and do business. What does metaverse offer B2B businesses, though? Let us take a look. From Virtual Storefronts to Digital Employees While metaverse is still in the early stages of development, businesses can have their own virtual storefronts, digital employees, and virtual currency in a virtual reality. Business exclusive metaverse platforms like Sansar, Somnium Space, and Decentraland offer companies an option to establish their virtual presence. How is Metaverse Transforming B2B Businesses? Metaverse presents businesses with the unique opportunity to build client relationships face-to-face. Branded experiences like product announcements, product showrooms, company updates, educational sessions, conferences, and networking events can be done in metaverse. Let us explore other ways in which metaverse can enrich B2B businesses: Richer Customer Experience Immersive buyer experiences influence prospects to make purchase decisions faster. B2B sellers in metaverse can create such experiences through interactions that surpass traditional sales approaches and focus on visually attractive sales presentations to convert prospects. Effective Marketing and Advertising New marketing and advertising opportunities in metaverse are developing with every passing day. Over time, companies may be able to sponsor events or create targets ads to attract a certain demographic. The companies that establish themselves in the metaverse might have a bigger advantage in this regard compared to the companies that venture into it later. Higher ROI and Sales Increasing sales and ROI are crucial for every business. Reaching new markets and tapping into new revenue sources is easier with metaverse. It will allow salespeople to host multiple meetings with buyers living in different parts of the world without having to leave their actual office, saving multiple costs while conveniently still creating client relationships that last. Improved Workforce Efficiency Metaverse-based training simulations help employees upgrade their skills. Additionally, customer service associates can create avatars to provide business customers assistance in real-time. Metaverse encourages employees to communicate better and allows remote employees to virtually connect for projects, meetings, and feedback. Last Word B2B businesses can capitalize on the convenience of metaverse and harness this latest technology to offer their customers visually immersive experiences.

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Technologies, Business

Hi-Res audio: It’s all about a maturing market

Article | August 3, 2022

Music streaming contrasts sharply with video streaming. While the video marketplace is characterised by unique catalogues, a variety of pricing and diverse value propositions music streaming services are all at their core fundamentally the same product. When the market was in its hyper-growth phase and there were enough new users to go around, it did not matter too much that the streaming services only had branding, curation and interface to differentiate themselves from each other. Now that we are approaching a slowdown in the high-revenue developed markets, more is needed. Which is where Hi-Res comes in.

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Technologies, Virtualization

The new chair of the FTC and antitrust 2.0

Article | August 2, 2022

The appointment of Lina Khan on June 15th to chair of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is poised to be a transformational one in the history of the world wide web. Khan came to prominence with an article in the Yale Law Journal, Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox, which identified the paradox of hegemonic tech service providers which bypass the US’ strict competition laws by offering lower prices to the end consumer. Under US antitrust law, the driving indicator of market monopolies are higher prices for the consumer – under this strict definition, none of the tech majors which dominate the digital economy are monopolistic. Indeed, some such as Alphabet and Facebook do not even directly charge the end user for their services. So, while both Google and Facebook dominate the global digital ad market, making an antitrust case against them under the current 20thcentury era regulatory framework is nigh on impossible. However, the absence of meaningful competitive challengers to these two incumbents in search and social advertising over the previous 15 years, despite the lucrative high margin business opportunities, implies that the competitive market is not performing according to classical economic theory. Khan has built a subsequent career on trying to square this circle, and now the Biden Administration has empowered her as the key instigator of the sweeping regulatory update required for a digital-first century.

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Media and Broadcasting

What are the most popular types of YouTube videos in 2021?

Article | May 19, 2021

Withover two billion userslogging onto YouTube every month, brands would be remiss to ignore the platform in their marketing strategy. However, like any marketing initiative, simply uploading a video to YouTube isn’t going to guarantee views, shares, likes, or success. Success comes down to creating therightcontent. A big part of this is understanding the type of content that historically does really well on the platform; in this case, the different kinds of YouTube videos get viewed most, especially by your audience. Mediakix, an influencer marketing agency, broke down the top 16 most popular types of videos on YouTube in a handy infographic below, but is this the right content for marketing your business?

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NVIDIA's Step in Data Centre Business Is a Success; Became as Big as Gaming

NVIDIA | May 25, 2020

NVIDIA Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue, NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers. NVIDIA has been stepping up its data center game for a while now. Last quarter's results indicate the effort has been worth it. Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year-over-year jump -- so big, in fact, that NVIDIA could justify pouring more time and resources into the market, now that it's proved it can do well in it. Data centers are the growth engine. For the three-month stretch ending on April 26, NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue into an adjusted per-share profit of $1.80. The top line was up 39% year over year, and adjusted earnings more than doubled from $0.88 per share in the prior-year quarter. Both numbers topped analysts' expectations, just as the company's revenue guidance for the current quarter did. That wasn't the most interesting aspect of NVIDIA's quarterly report, however. Far more intriguing was the $1.14 billion in data center technology sales. A year earlier, that figure was a much more modest $634 million. The quarterly tally trails gaming-related sales, which hit $1.34 billion for the first fiscal quarter, but ts data center business is growing much faster than any other segment. At its current pace, data center will overtake gaming as the company's biggest breadwinner. As history indicates, this is a fairly new development. Learn more: MICROGAMING COLLABORATES WITH INSPIRED ENTERTAINMENT TO ENHANCE GAMING EXPERIENCE . “NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business.” ~ Quant say News coverage of the numbers broadly suggested coronavirus-related lockdowns meant that companies were forced to improve their remote-work capabilities on the fly, generating demand for data center technology. And to be fair, the contagion likely did spur some fresh, unexpected demand. That's not how data centers usually work, though. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. The launch of the DGX A100 5-petaflop artificial intelligence (AI) system didn't happen until after the quarter began, but it was based on a design that was likely finalized before the COVID-19 outbreak. “NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers , though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. ” Ditto for Jarvis, an app platform that lets organizations tweak the use of AI in a variety of self-customized ways. It was launched last quarter, but prospective users are still kicking the tires. It can take months to just select and plan a data center's architecture. Enterprise customers didn't simply set up and pay for a data center in a matter of weeks. Ergo, if NVIDIA sold it last quarter, it was a sale that was apt to be set up well before the quarter began. To that end, one can readily see on the graphic above that data center sales had been ramping up for a couple of quarters even before the recently completed quarter got going. NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business Quant say it remains the clear leader in the graphics processing unit (GPU) market, which is NVIDIA's biggest business. It's a market worth fighting for. It's also worth noting that despite NVIDIA's data center growth last quarter, it still has only a small fraction of the data center computing market. Intel remains the powerhouse in the arena, leaning on its popular and more conventional data center technology -- based on central processing units (CPUs) -- to generate more than $23 billion in data center hardware revenue last year. NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers of tomorrow. Given the sales trajectory, though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. It's proved itself to be a player. It would be time (and effort) well spent. Market researcher Mordor Intelligence reports the size of the global GPU market was just under $21 billion as of last year, but the realization of GPUs as a powerful alternative to CPUs (particularly in AI) leads Mordor to conclude the GPU market will be worth more than $100 billion by 2024. Learn more: 20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY .

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Quake 2 is the best argument for Nvidia’s ray tracing

Venturebeat | January 22, 2019

If you want to see the potential of ray tracing, you should look to Quake 2. A new mod called Q2VKPT (Quake 2 with Vulkan path-tracing) is out now that adds real-time ray tracing to the classic shooter. And while Nvidia has turned to cutting-edge releases to hype people up for RTX, maybe it should use Quake 2 instead.In the 3-minute video above, you can see how effective RTX is at bringing a scene to life. White wall lamps reflect off of the floors. Explosions bathe the environment in momentary bursts of orange. And water reflects the entire room around it.All of this next-gen lighting tech is happening in a game that is from 1997. But RTX gives the world a sense of place and reality that looks almost modern. Sure, the enemy models are blocky and under animated, but they look like they are moving through physical space.

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Origin's Chronos PC is no looker, but it plays games with eye-popping detail

digitaltrends | January 21, 2019

We love giant tower computers. They’re big, bold, absurd, and we frankly prefer our computers to look more like an alien monolith than a useful piece of modern technology. Yet our way of thinking is certainly on the out. Computers continue to shrink in size as they grow in power.Which brings us to the Origin Chronos. The smallest desktop PC in the company’s line-up, the Chronos measures a bit less than a foot tall, four inches wide, and about 14 inches deep. That’s smaller than most A/V receivers, or about the size of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. It offers full-fat performance despite that. Our review unit came packing a Core i9-9900K and Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti, surely more than enough to please.Maybe the question is no longer “why should I buy a small desktop?” Maybe it’s now “why should I buy anything but?”

Read More

NVIDIA's Step in Data Centre Business Is a Success; Became as Big as Gaming

NVIDIA | May 25, 2020

NVIDIA Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue, NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers. NVIDIA has been stepping up its data center game for a while now. Last quarter's results indicate the effort has been worth it. Gaming is still the company's single biggest source of revenue, but data center sales saw a big year-over-year jump -- so big, in fact, that NVIDIA could justify pouring more time and resources into the market, now that it's proved it can do well in it. Data centers are the growth engine. For the three-month stretch ending on April 26, NVIDIA turned $3.08 billion of revenue into an adjusted per-share profit of $1.80. The top line was up 39% year over year, and adjusted earnings more than doubled from $0.88 per share in the prior-year quarter. Both numbers topped analysts' expectations, just as the company's revenue guidance for the current quarter did. That wasn't the most interesting aspect of NVIDIA's quarterly report, however. Far more intriguing was the $1.14 billion in data center technology sales. A year earlier, that figure was a much more modest $634 million. The quarterly tally trails gaming-related sales, which hit $1.34 billion for the first fiscal quarter, but ts data center business is growing much faster than any other segment. At its current pace, data center will overtake gaming as the company's biggest breadwinner. As history indicates, this is a fairly new development. Learn more: MICROGAMING COLLABORATES WITH INSPIRED ENTERTAINMENT TO ENHANCE GAMING EXPERIENCE . “NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business.” ~ Quant say News coverage of the numbers broadly suggested coronavirus-related lockdowns meant that companies were forced to improve their remote-work capabilities on the fly, generating demand for data center technology. And to be fair, the contagion likely did spur some fresh, unexpected demand. That's not how data centers usually work, though. A great deal of the data center hardware business booked by NVIDIA last quarter was likely planned before COVID-19 came into view. The launch of the DGX A100 5-petaflop artificial intelligence (AI) system didn't happen until after the quarter began, but it was based on a design that was likely finalized before the COVID-19 outbreak. “NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers , though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. ” Ditto for Jarvis, an app platform that lets organizations tweak the use of AI in a variety of self-customized ways. It was launched last quarter, but prospective users are still kicking the tires. It can take months to just select and plan a data center's architecture. Enterprise customers didn't simply set up and pay for a data center in a matter of weeks. Ergo, if NVIDIA sold it last quarter, it was a sale that was apt to be set up well before the quarter began. To that end, one can readily see on the graphic above that data center sales had been ramping up for a couple of quarters even before the recently completed quarter got going. NVIDIA isn't going to abandon gaming in favor of data centers. While Advanced Micro Devices has been stealing some graphics processing market share from NVIDIA, numbers from data tracker Business Quant say it remains the clear leader in the graphics processing unit (GPU) market, which is NVIDIA's biggest business. It's a market worth fighting for. It's also worth noting that despite NVIDIA's data center growth last quarter, it still has only a small fraction of the data center computing market. Intel remains the powerhouse in the arena, leaning on its popular and more conventional data center technology -- based on central processing units (CPUs) -- to generate more than $23 billion in data center hardware revenue last year. NVIDIA has its work cut out for it if it's going to persuade enterprise-level customers that GPUs are a better fit than CPUs for the data centers of tomorrow. Given the sales trajectory, though, NVIDIA can now further prioritize the development and sale of data center technologies. It's proved itself to be a player. It would be time (and effort) well spent. Market researcher Mordor Intelligence reports the size of the global GPU market was just under $21 billion as of last year, but the realization of GPUs as a powerful alternative to CPUs (particularly in AI) leads Mordor to conclude the GPU market will be worth more than $100 billion by 2024. Learn more: 20 GAMING COMPANIES IN ATLANTA ADDING NEW ELEMENTS TO A DECADES-OLD INDUSTRY .

Read More

Quake 2 is the best argument for Nvidia’s ray tracing

Venturebeat | January 22, 2019

If you want to see the potential of ray tracing, you should look to Quake 2. A new mod called Q2VKPT (Quake 2 with Vulkan path-tracing) is out now that adds real-time ray tracing to the classic shooter. And while Nvidia has turned to cutting-edge releases to hype people up for RTX, maybe it should use Quake 2 instead.In the 3-minute video above, you can see how effective RTX is at bringing a scene to life. White wall lamps reflect off of the floors. Explosions bathe the environment in momentary bursts of orange. And water reflects the entire room around it.All of this next-gen lighting tech is happening in a game that is from 1997. But RTX gives the world a sense of place and reality that looks almost modern. Sure, the enemy models are blocky and under animated, but they look like they are moving through physical space.

Read More

Origin's Chronos PC is no looker, but it plays games with eye-popping detail

digitaltrends | January 21, 2019

We love giant tower computers. They’re big, bold, absurd, and we frankly prefer our computers to look more like an alien monolith than a useful piece of modern technology. Yet our way of thinking is certainly on the out. Computers continue to shrink in size as they grow in power.Which brings us to the Origin Chronos. The smallest desktop PC in the company’s line-up, the Chronos measures a bit less than a foot tall, four inches wide, and about 14 inches deep. That’s smaller than most A/V receivers, or about the size of Microsoft’s Xbox One X. It offers full-fat performance despite that. Our review unit came packing a Core i9-9900K and Nvidia’s RTX 2080 Ti, surely more than enough to please.Maybe the question is no longer “why should I buy a small desktop?” Maybe it’s now “why should I buy anything but?”

Read More

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